DeVore Fidelity Gibbon Nines, 2-Way Speakers in a Gorgeous Finish MADE IN NYC!

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Well-reviewed and liked "The Nines" made right here in NYC.

In a gorgeous walnut finish which has aged nicely, much like a fine wine.

Both are in perfect working condition and were tested in our lab and listening room.

This listing includes the speakers, their magnetic grills, spikes and their original manual.

Flat $300 shipping anywhere within the lower 48 US states. If you're outside of this area please contact us for a quote.

Click below to add our recommended matching cables from Kimber Kable, all brand new as SkyFi is an official Kimber dealer. 

Kimber Kable - Speaker Cables

More on these speakers from Stereophile by Art Dudley:

"The opportunity for my first in-home DeVore Fidelity experience came last summer, when John DeVore offered to deliver and install a pair of his brand-new Gibbon Nines ($6500/pair). Not every loudspeaker in the DeVore line is referred to as a Gibbon —the current exception is the flagship Silverback Reference ($15,000/pair), which Mikey raved about in the March 2006 Stereophile —but they all benefit from an evidently unique approach to crossover technology called the Gibbon Circuit, the precise workings of which are a closely guarded secret. "It isn't a first-order, second-order, or third-order filter," DeVore says, "although it uses resistors, caps, and coils [of the usual sort]. It isn't a Band-Aid: Notch filters are offensive. Zobel networks are offensive..."

As DeVore explains, the first step in creating a good crossover circuit is to create good drivers. "Any speaker with a very stiff, undamped diaphragm that rings like crazy will create an enormous spike —and the standard practice is to design a circuit to compensate, and make it flat. The problem is, no matter what you do, the amplifier won't see it as flat." That's one reason DeVore gave the Gibbon Nine a 0.75" silk-dome tweeter, built in Europe to his specifications: It has "response to 40kHz, and no breakup." The other two drivers in the Nine are 6.5" plastic-cone woofers, also designed by DeVore and made for him by SEAS. In the 2.5-way Gibbon Nine, the lowest-frequency driver —the upper range of which rolls off before 100Hz —has a treatment applied to the inner surface of its cone, to alter its resonant frequency.

As to acoustical loading, the Nine is a bass-reflex loudspeaker, but with different ports for the two different low-frequency drivers. The Nine comprises two separate chambers; the upper one is, for all intents and purposes, a complete DeVore Gibbon Super 8. The lower port is longer than the upper one, and is thus tuned to a lower frequency. "Ports put out a lot of energy at a narrow band of frequencies," DeVore says, which can contribute to disturbing the relationship between amplifier and loudspeaker. By breaking them apart, so to speak, DeVore aims to spread out the peaks and minimize their effect on the amp.

The result of all that work is a narrow, medium-size floorstander (38" tall without spikes) with a nominal impedance of 8 ohms (5.6 ohms minimum), 91dB sensitivity, bass extension down to 31Hz, and a relatively high degree of placement flexibility; in other words, a loudspeaker that seems able to do just about anything.

All for the Nines
The DeVore Gibbon Nines were, simply, consistently fun to have around: They delighted me as much this morning as they did three months ago. The Nines responded clearly to the differences between various triode output tubes in my Fi 2A3 Stereo amp, and to the changes in scale between the different Shindo amps I've tried. More important, they responded to real music. On their first day here it was Stevie Wonder's uncannily modern-sounding "Pastime Paradise," from Songs in the Key of Life (LP, Tamla T13-34062); this morning it was "Semjase" and "The Bells of Love," from Big Dipper's Craps (LP, Homestead HMS 122-1). Every time out, they've made my music sound involving, impressive, and right.

Not to get too Zen about it or anything, but the Nine's greatest strength was its multitude of strengths —that and the manner in which it dispensed with all of my expectations. Compared to the typical high-sensitivity loudspeaker, the DeVore Nine was more open and less colored, with a significantly greater degree of spatial performance. At the same time, compared to the typical high-end speaker, the Nine was not only easier to drive, it was easier to love. It had more drama and sheer humanity than I've ever heard from such an outwardly conventional loudspeaker, and it never sounded boring or constricted."

Item

Included

Original Box

No

Manual

Yes

Remote

Not Applicable

Cables

No

Physical Condition

7

Working Condition

10

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